Cinema Of Bollywood Under 140 Year Old Bridge

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Films that are being screened are advertised in a makeshift cinema located under a bridge in the old quarters of Delhi, India May 25, 2016. REUTERS/Cathal McNaughton

Ishfaq , a small roadside eatery owner along with few others have organized a makeshift cinema hall under a 140-year-old bridge at the shores of River Yamuna. It has become a shelter for the poor rickshaw pullers and migrant laborers to escape from their hardships and find entertainment and rest in a little-crafted world of Bollywood.

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People watch a movie in a makeshift cinema located under a bridge in the old quarters of Delhi, India May 25, 2016. A makeshift cinema hall under a 140-year-old bridge in the Indian capital is allowing poor rickshaw pullers and migrant labourers to escape daily hardship and sweltering heat into a world of Bollywood song, dance and romance. With the rusty iron floor of the bridge as its ceiling and some old rags acquired on the cheap from a nearby crematorium serving as curtains and floor mats, the cinema shows four films a day. Organisers pooled their savings to rent an old TV set and video compact disc player, and charge 10 rupees (15 U.S cents) admission - a hundredth of the price of entry at Delhi's fanciest movie theatres. REUTERS/Cathal McNaughton SEARCH "CATHAL BOLLYWOOD" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES.
People watch a movie in a makeshift cinema located under a bridge in the old quarters of Delhi, India May 25, 2016. A makeshift cinema hall under a 140-year-old bridge in the Indian capital is allowing poor rickshaw pullers and migrant labourers to escape daily hardship and sweltering heat into a world of Bollywood song, dance and romance. With the rusty iron floor of the bridge as its ceiling and some old rags acquired on the cheap from a nearby crematorium serving as curtains and floor mats, the cinema shows four films a day. Organisers pooled their savings to rent an old TV set and video compact disc player, and charge 10 rupees (.15 US cents) admission – a hundredth of the price of entry at Delhi’s fanciest movie theatres. .

Setting Up Of Cinema

The organizers rented an old TV set and VCD player pooling their savings to set up a theatre like atmosphere under the rusty iron floor of the bridge adorned by few old rags cheaply acquired serving as curtains and floor mats.

cinema under
Source Reuters

Charging Rs 10 for admission and showing four films a day, the cinema hall continues to be a success among the poor residing in the country’s capital.

Mohammed Noor Islam , a regular at the cinema hall, is a migrant from West Bengal ,who is a junk dealer finds relief in this source of entertainment after his work in the scorching heat. He says, ” Films are much better. Many men get hooked on gambling and drugs and alcohol and they pass their time by drinking or smoking.” People like him who do not indulge in such activities watch movies and pass the time.

Another regular at the cinema Manoj, a rickshaw puller says that watching movie helps them forget their stress and helps them relax.

The cinema hall with a cool breezy atmosphere also becomes a place for many to rest and catch some sleep after dark.

Ishfaq who offers meals for 5-10 rupees at his food stall expresses his concern about the illegally set up cinema hall being closed down by the authorities.

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